Posts in Category: tech

BYOD Programs Responsible for 53% Higher Revenues in 2015

Tech juggernaut Dell has published the results from its annual Global Technology Adoption Index for the year 2015. According to the study, mobility is currently responsible for a 50% difference in performance between the companies that have a BYOD policy set in place and those that don’t.

The Dell Global Technology Adoption Index (GTAI) 2015 report shows how IT and business decision makers of mid-market organizations around the world perceive and use four key technologies: the cloud, mobility (BYOD), security and big data

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They’ve Done It – Researchers Create Artificial Skin That Senses Touch

They've Done It – Researchers Create Artificial Skin That Senses Touch | Image credits: Stanford

Stanford this week featured an article about its latest technological feat: artificial skin that can “feel.” That’s right. Professor Zhenan Bao and a few other engineering wizards have put the finishing touches on a material that can replicate human skin and sense touch and pressure and send those signals to the human brain.

The “skin” is made of two layers of rubber, one of which has a flexible circuit printed on it. In between the two layers there’s a

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What Is the Internet of Things, Anyway? [Infographic]

If you’re a frequent visitor on our blog, chances are you’ve read our recent analysis of the impact of IoT (Internet of Things) in the foreseeable future. And if the Privacy Panic Cycle is indeed about to be renewed, it’s probably a good idea to stay informed about the next wave of intimidating technologies.

So what exactly is the Internet of Things? Harbor Research in cooperation with Postscapes decided to answer this question once and for all using the best way you can convey information – an infographic

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IoT – How The World Will React to the Sensors of Tomorrow

In the next century, planet earth will don an electronic skin. It will use the Internet as a scaffold to support and transmit its sensations.” – Neil Gross 1999

Did you know that society undergoes a “privacy panic cycle” every time new technologies come out? It’s true. The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) has documented this well. The non-partisan think tank has put together a diagram that shows exactly how the process takes place, and if research by Deloitte is any indication, we’re in for a new wave of panic. A tsunami even

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Celebrating Ada Lovelace – The First Computer Programmer in History

Ada Lovelace and The Analytics Engine | Image credits: hippowallpapers.com

Google isn’t featuring a doodle today and, by all means, it should. In 2009, as a response to the lack of women on stage at tech conferences, former Executive Director of the Open Rights Group, Suw Charman-Anderson decided to make October 13 “Ada Lovelace Day,” in an effort to increase the profile of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math education). Ada, who lived in the 1800s, is often regarded as the first computer programmer

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Chasing Digital Value – Most Companies Want Returns, Not Disruption

Chasing Digital Value – Most Companies Want Returns, Not Disruption (Silicon die | Image credits: wallpapersme.com)

According to the PWC 2015 Global Digital IQ Survey, “digital” is creating significant disruption inside organizations everywhere, but not so much on the outside. Few companies are looking at tech investments with the same eyes, but those who see disruption power in digital have been attributed a “Digital IQ” that surpasses that of ordinary companies.

If technology does one thing right, it’s disruption. New technology means new capabilities, new inroads, new ways to reach the market or answer customer needs, faster ways to reach the market and customer needs, and so on, and so forth

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Coding Could Become a Requirement for US Students

It’s becoming increasingly important to master a computer, not just the basic stuff, but also the underpinnings: making apps, building a site, or leveraging the cloud in business. Today, software engineering is one of the highest-paid jobs worldwide, and there are plenty of slices to be had from that financial pie still.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel knows this. He is rooting for computer science and coding classes in school. Not optionally, but mandatory. Specifically, he wants programming to be a graduation prerequisite

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Google Shrinks Down the Internet with Brotli Compression Algorithm

Google Shrinks Down the Internet with Brotli Compression Algorithm | Image credits: pxleyes.com

Last time anyone counted heads on the Internet, there were more than 3.2 billion active users scattered worldwide (more or less evenly). The World Wide Web Consortium (WC3) has even had to adopt new types of IP addresses (IPv6) because the older ones (IPv4) were running out. The data generated annually is being measured in exabytes (1 billion gigabytes). Internet providers estimate that annual global IP traffic will shift into a new gear, passing the zettabyte threshold by the end of 2016. For who’s asking, that’s 1024 exabytes.

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Technology Is Evolving Faster Than We Can Handle It

Technology Is Evolving Faster Than We Can Use It | Image credits: vrana.blog.bg

Not too long ago, we discussed how a number of African countries were going mobile before they could even be fitted with landlines. Cell phones are dirt cheap today and ‘wireless’ is the norm, so it’s no surprise that copper-wire infrastructures are becoming irrelevant.

The same thing is happening across other industries and applications. According to a survey commissioned by Deloitte,

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Why iOS Gets More Apps Faster Than Android [Infographic]

Device Fragmentation - Why iOS Gets More Apps Faster Than Android | Image credits: OpenSignal

It’s no mystery that despite having less reach than Android, iOS is preferred by developers who put bread on the table by coding apps. The reason? Well, there are many reasons for that, but there is one crucial aspect where Android fares much worse than iOS: fragmentation.

Device fragmentation is both good and bad, depending on how you look at it. If you’re Google, fragmentation is good because it means you get to put your OS on a plethora of devices big and small, cheap or pricey, and in countries where Apple has yet to sell its expensive iPhone and iPad. But if you’re a developer or a regular user, fragmentation is not so good.

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